Many colleges have interesting histories and for each institute of higher learning, there’s some kind of backstory. Lots of minor details are unknown to most people and the only ones who learn these fascinating facts are some of the students who attend the school. Instead of sitting idly by, take time to learn the interesting histories of various colleges throughout the country. I’d like to focus on the University of Jamestown, located in Jamestown, North Dakota and attended by less than a thousand students at a time.

 

Basic information

This private liberal arts school was established in 1883 and sits on about 110 acres of land in Jamestown. It’s considered a rural school that has a lot of campus space with plenty of green in it. The colors of the college are orange and black with a knight as their mascot. Students proudly refer to themselves as “jimmies” in relation to following their athletic teams.

 

Interesting background

Since the school initially opened, it was co-educational, which was pretty unusual for any school at the time. After it first opened, the college only functioned for ten years before it was forced to close in 1893 because of the depression. Luckily, it reopened in 1909 and has not closed its doors since then. The college is well-known in three distinct areas: athletics (it has a division 1 ice hockey team), high medical school acceptance rates, and their phenomenal choir. This choir was the first choir from America to perform in Notre Dame Cathedral, which occurred in 1972.

 

Modern traditions

When the college was first founded, it was known as Jamestown College. University of Jamestown is a much more recent name, which was given to it by the current College President, Robert Badal, in 2013. This change occurred when the college expanded the classes it offered, now providing students with a possible masters degree and applied doctorate degrees. The college continues to grow and receive accolades for its athletic teams, leading to even more traditions and history at this unique university.